Pregnancy is stressful for the circulatory system and caring for the unborn child puts a strain on the body.

  • Put your legs up
  • Cooling the legs (foot bath or legs with a cool shower)
  • Don’t drink too much alcohol
  • Much exercise, because this stimulates the blood circulation and the fluid is transported away
  • Drink enough water

Swollen legs during pregnancy

Pregnancy is stressful for the circulatory system and caring for the unborn child is a burden on the body. As a result, many pregnant women suffer from water retention. You should therefore not sit too long and can ask your gynecologist about compression stockings. These support the veins and reduce the risk of thrombosis and also the risk of water retention. While it may seem logical to you to drink less, you shouldn’t do this because thick blood can encourage water retention. It is better if you put your legs up regularly and before the feet are swollen.

Legs swollen after flying

Sitting for long periods on a plane often causes swollen legs. You can wear travel trumps as a preventative measure. You should not take them off until a few hours after flying, when the veins have recovered somewhat. Also, try to keep moving. You can get up and walk through the plane. But you can also rotate your feet regularly and thus promote blood circulation.

More tips against swollen legs

Regardless of the reasons for your leg swelling, there are several preventative measures that can generally help. Our tips are:

  • Be aware of your food. Balanced food and plenty of water strengthen the body and reduce water retention. Tomatoes, for example, are good for water retention.
  • Avoid being overweight.
  • Get used to unhealthy habits like smoking.
  • Reduce stress, because this can also promote water retention.
  • Exercise.

So make sure you have a healthy lifestyle to do something good for your general well-being and your legs.

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“” Culture is the new salt “” is Bad Ischl’s motto for 2024. Five things that you can already experience there.

The decision has been made: Bad Ischl will be European Capital of Culture in 2024 and thus prevailed against St. Pölten and Dornbirn. One reason for the decision was probably that Bad Ischl’s application addressed the problem of overtourism and presented Hallstatt to the jury as a warning example. “” We want to become the European role model for balancing tourism with culture.1 2 3 help essay The cultural tourist is an antithesis to the Asian traveler, who sometimes only stayed for a photo “, explained Bad Ischl project manager Stefan Heinisch.

Bad Ischl will bear the title, but another 20 communities in the Upper Austrian and Styrian Salzkammergut are part of the project under the motto “” Culture is the new salt “”. Because, according to Heinisch: “” The subject of salt is ultimately the DNA that welds us all together. “”

The Kaiservilla and Zaunerstollen are still among the main attractions for visitors. Bad Ischl wants to get away from this image as the cultural capital – there is still some time for that until 2024.

1. Imperial Villa

© Shutterstock.com

The imperial villa served as the summer residence of Emperor Franz Joseph I and Empress Sisi. Every year around August 18th, the “” Kaiser birthday “” is extensively celebrated in Bad Ischl

2. Offensee

© APA / picturedesk.com / Franz Egger

The Offensee is one of the small and lesser-known lakes in the Salzkammergut, but no less beautiful. There are some wild and romantic places to swim. In winter the lake becomes a natural ice rink

3rd Glöckler run

© picturedesk.com/Walter Pernkopf

The Glöcklerlauf is an old custom in the Salzkammergut. During the Raunacht from 5th to 6th January the Schönperchten are supposed to drive away evil spirits with their bells. The elaborately manufactured, internally illuminated caps can weigh up to 15 kilos

4. Zauner confectionery

© picturedesk.com/Markus Morianz

The Zauner pastry shop is a must for all lovers of excellent pastries. Probably the most popular product of the former k. u. k. Hochzuckerbäckerei is the Zaunerstollen known far beyond the Salzkammergut

5. Katrin cable car

© Shutterstock.com

Since 1959, the Katrin cable car has been taking guests to Bad Ischl’s local mountain with its nostalgic four-gondolas. Once at the top you can hike, climb or simply enjoy the view

This post originally appeared in News 46/2019.

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In Namibia, a 59-year-old Upper Austrian was trampled to death by an elephant on Wednesday. The man was traveling privately with his wife and four friends when the tragic accident occurred, confirmed the Foreign Ministry in Vienna. The embassy in Pretoria had been informed by the tour group that the man had been attacked and killed by an elephant.

International media such as the British Daily Mail or the US television channel CNN have announced more information. The accident is said to have happened while camping near the Huab River in northwestern Namibia. They also quote a spokesman for the Ministry of Tourism, according to which the place on which the group is said to have pitched their tents is not a designated campsite.

© APA / Martin Hirsch / lor / ck / mts

The ministry therefore repeated its call on vacationers via Facebook to “” always be careful and adhere to the rules and regulations that were introduced for their safety “”. However, the media erroneously spoke of the fact that the dead person on Wednesday was an Australian and not a man from Austria.

The area around the Huab River is interesting for tourists because of the unique desert elephants. Worldwide there are only two populations of the species, one of them in Namibia. The animals cover up to 70 kilometers a day and can do without water for up to four days.

Elephants can be unpredictable

In Africa there are always fatal incidents between tourists and elephants. The animals are generally regarded as “” gentle giants “”, “” but they are dangerous, strong, ruthless and unpredictable when we cross the invisible line between them and us “”, warned the tourism provider “” gondwana-collection ” “online.

In order to avoid incidents in principle, the animals should be kept at least 50 meters away. Loud noises are also prohibited. “” Elephants are not allowed to be fed, like all other wild animals, “” warned the nature conservation and accommodation company.

“” Gondwana-collection “” also has advice for camping on its website: You should never camp at water points, because these attract animals. At best, camp for the night should be set up at the foot of a mountain, on an embankment or on rocks. “” So you can’t be surprised from behind and if necessary you can get to safety there, “” it said. In general, you should not camp near elephant trails.

Before going to bed, make sure that no food has been left open to attract the animals. If elephants come to a campsite anyway, you should keep quiet and never switch on the lights.

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Czech ex-foreign minister Karl Schwarzenberg on the development of his first homeland, Bohemia, and politics in his second homeland, Austria.

This week is the anniversary of the “” Velvet Revolution “” in what was then Czechoslovakia. Is it possible to celebrate the end of communism without restrictions in the Eastern European countries, or are there downsides? On the one hand, it is a pleasure to see how Eastern Europe has developed. Look to Poland or Bohemia or Slovakia. The rise, the prosperity are gigantic. On the other hand, one is not happy that there are parties there that are unfriendly, to put it mildly. It is unfortunate that in a country like Hungary, which has carried out a bloody revolution for freedom, it has been significantly reduced there. When there is practically no opposition and most of the media are close to the government, there is the question of political freedom.

The situation in Hungary remains worrying? Perhaps it will be better if an opposition member is elected mayor in Budapest. But by then the power was almost absolute.

Is Viktor Orbán now reaching his limits? Every politician reaches his limits. I’m an old forester. Never have I ever seen a tree that grew up into the sky.

How long will Orbán’s tree continue to grow? A few more years. But if the economic situation in Europe worsens, then he too will suffer. Orbán and Andrej Babis in the Czech Republic both benefited from having started when the economy was going well.

Babis’ minority government is backed by the communists. Isn’t communism over? I am not afraid that the communists will come back. But this support means corruption of all politics. The main thing is to keep power and to happily distribute the benefices, whereby the communists naturally participate and get their share.

© Lord God / News

Erhard Busek criticizes the fact that crimes from the time of communism have not yet been dealt with in the successor states. Would you agree with that? And can you criticize that as an Austrian if you know how long it took to come to terms with the Nazi era? We are the same people in two languages. Neither of them went into coming to terms with the past voluntarily. A lot has happened in Austria in recent years. However, some chapters of the communist era were dealt with very thoroughly, especially under pressure from the youth, such as the Brno death march. But the 1950s and 1960s, when the Czechs killed each other, haven’t really worked through. It’s just difficult when your own father or grandfather was involved.

How is Austria actually perceived in the Eastern European countries? People like to go to Vienna or to the various ski resorts. But politically it has been noticed that in contrast to Germany, which has tried very hard to create a new relationship, the efforts in Austria are less. To this day. Age-old prejudices prevail: the motorway to Budapest was ready in five years, the motorway to Prague is still not.

Why is that? People like the Hungarians here, but not the Czechs. The Tyroleans and Vorarlbergers don’t care about the Czechs, they are just as welcome as the Norwegians and Dutch. But here in Eastern Austria, where everyone has a Czech grandmother and, embarrassingly, a Czech surname, there are strong prejudices. For me it is always a pleasure that top FPÖ officials have or had Czech names: Strache comes from Strachota, Vilimisky, Westenthaler, who was called Hojac. That always entertained me.

The FPÖ has emphasized its sympathy for the Visegrád states in recent years. Yes and no, we say: your love for Hungary. There is also a certain proximity to Serbia, poor young Gudenus even married a Serbian woman. But there is nothing about the other countries, such as the closest Bohemia.

Austria always sees itself as a bridgehead to the Eastern European countries, but you miss foreign policy initiatives? There used to be this reluctance because joining the EEA was the most important thing for Austria in the early 1990s. And you don’t like going to an elegant salon with your poor cousin, who is also poorly dressed and doesn’t speak well. We weren’t fancy. They had close relations with Switzerland and the Benelux countries, but they were more embarrassed about their neighbors.

© Karl Schöndorfer / picturedesk.com

The Federal President traditionally makes his first state visits to these neighboring countries. Every head of state has to do that. This is nothing special, with all due respect. Alexander Van der Bellen tries, that’s right. But the chancellor? The Foreign Minister?

Sebastian Kurz used to be Foreign Minister too. A senior official of his said: Neighborhood relations are for the governors. You have repeatedly expressed concern about nationalist, populist tendencies.

What are your findings after the Austrian election? Here they have committed political suicide. Thankfully. The FPÖ is weakened, but not yet excluded as a government partner. First the Ibiza video and then Mr. Strache’s bills – if it hadn’t been for that, the FPÖ would of course be the ÖVP’s closest and most convenient business partner.

If Sebastian Kurz forms a coalition with the Greens, do you think he will turn away from right-wing populist content? If it doesn’t do him any good, why should he take care of her? He will look at it soberly from a utility point of view. Like every politician, he looks to see what brings him what. Politicians are not Caritas officials.

Half a year ago people in Austria were concerned about the rule of law and human rights.